Exogal Comet Plus Non-Digital DAC. It Knows What You want to Hear

$3,500.00
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Exogal Comet Plus DAC. It Knows Math Way Better Than You and It Knows What You Want to Hear.

At True Audiophile

We haven't had our hearts in carrying a DAC since we imported Human Audio. We listened to lots of DACs and all of them left us, meh. Clean, check. Dynamics, check. Soundstage, check. Analog-like, UN-check. Natural sounding, UN-check. We just never got excited. Then finally we heard the Exogal Comet. A DAC like no other. None of the same architecture or approach. Forget asking about which DAC chip they use because they only use a DAC chip to assign inputs and output. All the rest is done with math. Pure math to trace the musical wave precisely and evenly without need of filters and excess circuitry to fill in the wonky stair step trace. We think you will love this DAC. -- TA

Available for Audio Concierge (in Home Demo)

"The driving bass line in Paul Weller’s “Peacock Suit” instantly convinces me that the Comet Plus is an excellent DAC. It renders music with cohesion, with a groove that is unmistakable. Best of all you won’t find yourself saying “pretty good for digital...Out of this world good!” Jeff Dorgay Tone Magazine

HiFi+  - Alan Sircom
" Exogal may be a new player in the game, but it has some very wise heads on those young shoulders. One of those heads is Jim Kinne, and his audio hits include Wadia’s highly respected 27 Decoding Computer. The Comet is in essence the distillation of a career (or three) designing ultra-high performance audio devices.
Exogal – like Wadia before it and Chord Electronics today – eschews standard DAC technology, instead using an FGPA (field gate programmable array) for the conversion process. Six of them in fact, each acting as stereo DAC chips for the balanced, single-ended, and headphone circuits as standard.
 
The Exogal’s strongest suit perhaps is that it isn’t the most immediately revealing revelation. If that sounds like a contradiction in terms, it’s simply that a lot of audio seems to be initially impressive, where the Exogal slowly, but inexorably, convinces you of just how damn good it is. Some will never get this, because they want the ten-second ‘wow!’ demonstration. Others will realise music is about more than just being impressive and discover their music holds deeper joys. I played ‘The Pull’ from Richmond Fontaine’s excellent We Used To Think The Freeway Sounded Like A River [Décor] and felt wrist-slittingly ‘uplifted’ rather than blown away by the sound, which is precisely how you should feel when listening to this track. High-res is great through the Comet (it will happily play 32/384 and DSD128) but it isn’t mandatory, because you find yourself drawn to the music rather than the sound it makes. You can do that to almost any genre or style of music: I even ploughed through some truly wonderful – but horribly recorded – 1970s Ethopian jazz-funk by Mulatu Astatke (‘Yègelié Tezeta’ on Ethiopiques Vol 4 [Buda]) and the Exogal simply got out of the way to let the groove play on. It also did the same through the digitised line input,
 
Absolute Sound - about the enclosure
The Comet’s curvaceous anodized aluminium sides and top are fastened onto an unusual base that looks like a slab of acrylic resting on four steel ball-bearings. I asked Haagenstad about the base, and he informed me that “not just the base but also the entire chassis is part of a constrained damping structure. We tried rubber feet, but they just didn’t give us what we wanted in vibration damping. I know: Go figure that rubber didn’t adequately damp the vibration, and that’s the reason. We scanned the chassis to find out where it resonated and the steel feet eliminated that last resonant frequency. Now it’s vibrationally as dead as a brick. Give it a rap with your knuckles and see.” I did and it was. Dead, I mean.

"We all have different tastes, but what we all do seem to like is depth, soundstage, separation – a natural, encompassing experience when listening to music and this is what I am getting from the Exogal Comet Plus. I am playing tracks which I know intimately, ones which are indelibly etched in my mind and ears, and I’m hearing just that bit more, reaching right out at me; grabbing my attention at each successive play."  David Blumenstein, HIFIPig

"For its superbly refined, tonally rich, continuous and fluid sound and adding DSD support, extensive connectivity, a beautifully solid housing and Bluetooth control, this really is a pretty impressive package. Add in its realistic price tag and it becomes something of a bargain.." Christiaan Punter, HiFi Advice

"It has amazing dynamics and its sound is incredibly open to information (not details). All recordings sound better and more natural with it, a bit like from an analog tape." Wojciech Pacuta

EXOGAL COMET WINS A "BEST PRODUCT OF THE YEAR" AWARD BY HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE 

From the folks who created and brought us WADIA 

EXOGAL COMET DAC / Digital PreAmp

And what we believe you want to hear is truly a natural sounding Dac that leaves the digital artifacts behind bringing it all that much closer to the vaunted analog.

**Note** this price includes the upgraded outboard power supply, normally $600

The Exogal Comet is a high performance digital to analog audio converter (DAC) playing up to 32/384k and DSD. Connect your computer, or other digital/analog source, and while you might have heard this promise before, you really will experience exceptional audiophile sound. 

The Comet DAC can be run direct into your power amp although we recommend the companion Exogal ION amp for flawless transfer to your speakers. The Comet will work with most pre-amps if you already have an amp you love. Otherwise, the Comet/Ion combo is a 'you have to hear it to believe it'.

It's fully differential balanced internally. Both the XLR and RCA outputs each have DACs, so there is no compromise with either.

The Comet DAC is also, as you would expect, a digital preamp and does everything you would expect a high-end DAC to do, including balanced and unbalanced analog outputs, digital volume control and asynchronous USB input - all at a sensible price.

 Benefits​

  • Designed for real-life listening with sound that’s amazing, whatever the setting

  • Easy digital upgrades for hardware and software

  • Controlled by the Exogal Remote App for Android or Apple iOS 

Features

  • Asynchronous USB, AES/EBU, SPDIF, Toslink, and line level Analog input

  • Direct connection analog outputs with 32-bit Digital Volume Control

  • Analog Outputs: one pair balanced (XLR), one pair unbalanced (RCA), one stereo Headphone

  • Single ended and balanced analog outputs can be used simultaneously. Single ended outputs can be programmed as stereo, or center/subwoofer operation. Single ended outputs have a programmable offset level from balanced outputs

[[[specification_start]]]

Digital Inputs: AES/EBU on XLR, SPDIF on 75Ohm BNC,

                        Toslink, USB-B, Analog on isolated RCA
 

Analog Outputs: One Pair Balanced (XLR), One Pair Unbalanced (RCA)
 

USB System Requirements

Apple: OS 10.6.4 or higher - No driver needed

PC: Windows XP SP3, Windows Vista SP2 or higher,

Windows 7, Windows 8 & 8.1, Windows 10 

Weight: 9.2 lbs (4.2 kg)
Dimensions (HWD): 1.875 x 7.45 x 11.5 in., (4.76 x 19.0 x 29.2 cm)
 

Finish: Clear (Silver) or Black Anodized Aluminum  

 


[[[specification_end]]]

  • Controlled by the Exogal Remote App for Android phone or tablet (running 4.3 or higher with BLE support) or an iPad, iPhone 4s or newer, or iPod Touch.

[[[proreview_start]]]

"The driving bass line in Paul Weller’s “Peacock Suit” instantly convinces me that the Comet Plus is an excellent DAC. It renders music with cohesion, with a groove that is unmistakable. Best of all you won’t find yourself saying “pretty good for digital...Out of this world good!...

A unique destination

With a certain trend in digital pushing more towards opposite ends of the price spectrum, with exciting things going on in the five and six-figure range, as well as the next to nothing column. There isn’t much going on for the music lover that would like to step up from their OPPO but doesn’t want to take a second mortgage on the house or have a modded component. While I’ve had some intriguing experiences with modded components, at the end of the day, they remain Frankensteins. Personally, I’d rather plunk my hard-earned cash down on the original manufacturer.

There’s a lot of brain trust from Wadia at Exogal, and for those of you not familiar, Wadia was a groundbreaking digital company. Consequently, while the Comet Plus has some unique technology under the hood, it is incredibly user-friendly. Combining clean design, robust build quality and above all, fantastic sound makes the Exogal Comet Plus and Exceptional Value Award winner. I suggest spending a few bucks and just getting the Plus model with the bigger power supply because you know your inner tweakasaurus wants it anyway. Highly recommended; and just step up to the plate for the better power supply. It’s worth it and you know you’ll want it anyway.­­­

” Jeff Dorgay Tone Magazine READ THE FULL REVIEW

HiFi+  - Alan Sircom
" Exogal may be a new player in the game, but it has some very wise heads on those young shoulders. One of those heads is Jim Kinne, and his audio hits include Wadia’s highly respected 27 Decoding Computer. The Comet is in essence the distillation of a career (or three) designing ultra-high performance audio devices.
Exogal – like Wadia before it and Chord Electronics today – eschews standard DAC technology, instead using an FGPA (field gate programmable array) for the conversion process. Six of them in fact, each acting as stereo DAC chips for the balanced, single-ended, and headphone circuits as standard.
 
This array of FGPAs is inherently ‘open ended’. It’s less of a DAC design set in stone, and more of a digital platform capable of significant upgrades through firmware. While nothing is ever entirely ‘future-proofed’, this inherently upgradable design means your Comet DAC is less likely than most to fall obsolete. Any prospective change is just lines of code: even if tomorrow we end up listening to multichannel music, with those six fully programmable DACs in tow, the task is not beyond the Exogal’s reach. We shouldn’t play down the amount of work required to write that putative code, but for the end user, it offers some guarantee against your Comet being Last Year’s Big Thing.
The other great advantage to a fully programmable array is this allows for custom filter options, and the Comet offers one linear, two minimum phase, and one spline filter
 
Where the Exogal really moves into ‘tomorrow’ technology is it has a pair of line-level phono inputs, which pass through a custom 24/96 A/D conversion, which is upsampled to 24/384 for internal use. This turns the Exogal into a digital hub.
 
The "milestone" Wadia 27 was one of the most natural, unforced, exciting, and detailed converters money could buy, and even today its performance would be hard to replicate. Except the Exogal Comet does just that. It doesn’t serve up a clone of the infamous Wadia 27 sound, but it has that same sense of music unconstrained by the electronics being played, especially in soundstage terms. You get a sense of why that ‘holographic soundstaging’ cliché exists when you hear something like ‘Church’ from Lyle Lovett’s Joshua Judges Ruth [MCA]; those handclaps and voices from the choir really do appear in a three-dimensional space in front of the listener, whatever the system.
 
The Exogal’s strongest suit perhaps is that it isn’t the most immediately revealing revelation. If that sounds like a contradiction in terms, it’s simply that a lot of audio seems to be initially impressive, where the Exogal slowly, but inexorably, convinces you of just how damn good it is. Some will never get this, because they want the ten-second ‘wow!’ demonstration. Others will realise music is about more than just being impressive and discover their music holds deeper joys. I played ‘The Pull’ from Richmond Fontaine’s excellent We Used To Think The Freeway Sounded Like A River [Décor] and felt wrist-slittingly ‘uplifted’ rather than blown away by the sound, which is precisely how you should feel when listening to this track. High-res is great through the Comet (it will happily play 32/384 and DSD128) but it isn’t mandatory, because you find yourself drawn to the music rather than the sound it makes. You can do that to almost any genre or style of music: I even ploughed through some truly wonderful – but horribly recorded – 1970s Ethopian jazz-funk by Mulatu Astatke (‘Yègelié Tezeta’ on Ethiopiques Vol 4 [Buda]) and the Exogal simply got out of the way to let the groove play on. It also did the same through the digitised line input,
 
Absolute Sound - about the enclosure
The Comet’s curvaceous anodized aluminium sides and top are fastened onto an unusual base that looks like a slab of acrylic resting on four steel ball-bearings. I asked Haagenstad about the base, and he informed me that “not just the base but also the entire chassis is part of a constrained damping structure. We tried rubber feet, but they just didn’t give us what we wanted in vibration damping. I know: Go figure that rubber didn’t adequately damp the vibration, and that’s the reason. We scanned the chassis to find out where it resonated and the steel feet eliminated that last resonant frequency. Now it’s vibrationally as dead as a brick. Give it a rap with your knuckles and see.” I did and it was. Dead, I mean.

REVIEW OF THE COMET IN HIFIPig
By David Blumenstein

"We all have different tastes, but what we all do seem to like is depth, soundstage, separation – a natural, encompassing experience when listening to music and this is what I am getting from the Exogal Comet Plus. I am playing tracks which I know intimately, ones which are indelibly etched in my mind and ears, and I’m hearing just that bit more, reaching right out at me; grabbing my attention at each successive play." Read Full Review

REVIEW OF THE COMET FROM HI-FI ADVICE, May 2017
By Christiaan Punter

"For its superbly refined, tonally rich, continuous and fluid sound and adding DSD support, extensive connectivity, a beautifully solid housing and Bluetooth control, this really is a pretty impressive package. Add in its realistic price tag and it becomes something of a bargain.." Read Full Review

 

EXOGAL COMET WINS A "BEST PRODUCT OF THE YEAR" AWARD BY HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE, POLAND,
By Wojciech Pacuta

"It has amazing dynamics and its sound is incredibly open to information (not details). All recordings sound better and more natural with it, a bit like from an analog tape." 

 


[[[proreview_end]]]

 

Exogal's non-dac, Dac. At True Audiophile.

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