NEW Transrotor Max Turntable

$4,999.00
Current stock: 0

NEW!!! Transrotor MAX Turntable. Beautiful. Precise. Brilliant.

Now at True Audiophile.

Its finally here! TT lovers have been begging for a Fat Bob baby and the new TransRotor Max is that table. All handcrafted by one of the oldest turntable companies in the world. Massive and polished. This new entry table from TransRotor is more dramatic that many competitors top-of-the-line.

Photo shows option 2nd arm. Table comes standard with one arm. Add $850 for a 9" arm or $950 for a 12" arm.

Table comes with EINS Power Supply, Axiss Audio 9" OEM Jelco arm and Shelter 201 Cartridge. 

From Hifi. NL: With the Max, Transrotor has created a nice addition to the lower regions of its own price list. The record player is - just like almost all players of the brand that I have ever encountered - extremely beautiful finish and exudes luxury.The option to process the motor in the player itself can bring an additional optical advantage, the player is easy to adjust and adjust and the TR-800-S arm is pleasant to use. A tip for those who want to do longer with the same string, turn the platform by hand and then switch on the motor, which prevents unnecessary stretching.

In addition, the Transrotor Max is also soundly capable of many beautiful things, as shown by the display in combination with the Eroica LX element. The player explains the music to the listener in an analytical way, but with a lot more drive than many other mass moves. The timing in the display is also excellent. The extremely quiet running gear is also an absolute plus of the Max. This view can be further optimized by the user by using an extra 9 inch or 12 inch tone arm base to mount another arm with an element and to upgrade the power supply with a Konstant Eins or Constant M-1 Reference power supply, which allows the speed adjustment immediately change from manual to electronic. Or you can purchase the more luxurious TMD bearing. This Transrotor is therefore an excellent basis to enjoy vinyl for many year.

(for more click the review tab) 

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The search for a new record player in the upper middle class will come true for many consumers at the well-known brands in running country. One of those brands is of course Transrotor, which with a unique and recognizable appearance can also be based on years of experience. Not so long ago the brand introduced a new entry-level record player: the Max.

The German company Transrotor from Jochen Räke is highly regarded by many audiophiles and music lovers. With iconic record players such as the Super Seven, the Fat Bob in all its editions, the Orfeo and of course the exorbitantly expensive top models such as the Opollon and Artus, the brand has provided the European market with analogue and aesthetic pleasure for many decades. The Teutonic designers were also able to come up with unique solutions for bearing, driving and optimizing the measured values ​​of record players. A powerful piece of history.

Get in

With the introduction of the Max record player, the manufacturer lowered the threshold for interested vinyl trays.With a price card that - without poor- just above 2000 euros starts and an appearance that many art lovers will still speak to, the Transrotor Max on paper is a great base to enjoy a higher level of vinyl. Complete with arm and element, the record player is available from 2850 euros. The cheapest complete execution was supplied by the importer for this review.

The company from Bergisch Gladbach looked closely at the already existing models from their own repertoire for the design of the Max. Whoever sees the Max in this way and knows the brand Transrotor, will of course quickly think of a compact version of the Fat Bob. That is also not surprising. Because despite the fact that even this - disrespectfully said - 'entry-Transrotor' is still a mass movement with a beautiful polished aluminum appearance, he also looks a lot like his bigger brother.

Smart

Anyone who looks closely at the Max, however, quickly sees differences. First of all there is the compact motor with an external power supply with its own switch and two supplied strings of different lengths. Just like those strings, the two possibilities for switching on the mains voltage also fall. Why double? The answer is hidden in the chassis of the record player, in which a recess is made to place the motor out of sight, under the 7 kilo heavy turntable. Turning on the power here would be difficult if there was no additional switch on the external power supply. Smart for those who have less room to place a record player. The turntable itself is equipped with milled rings at the bottom, to ensure even better synchronization. On top of the turntable is a black disc made of acrylic composite, on which the vinyl rests while playing.  

As a bearing, a brass / steel combination is used for the basic version of the Max. The chassis manufactured from solid aluminum has two pairs of recesses. In the case of the complete basic version, one set of recesses is filled with two tubes, on which the arm base is mounted. If you want to fit a second arm with an element, you simply purchase a second tonearm base, which is delivered by Transrotor in both a 9 inch and a 12 inch version. The chassis rests on three round aluminum legs and weighs about 16 kilos, completely the shiny player weighs about 20 kilos. A matching plate puck, adjustment and maintenance materials and of course white gloves should also not be missing from the Max.

The tone arm used by Transrotor is the well-known TR-800-S, originating from the Jelco factory with the SA-250-S as the basis. This S-shaped arm is equipped with the suspension typical for Jelco and makes changing headshells easy by the use of a (SME) bayonet fastener. Transrotor supplies a nice arm cable.

The element that comes with the basic version of the Transrotor Max is a Goldring Elektra MM element. This element is equipped with an elliptical needle shape and delivers an output of no less than 7 mV, making it suitable for many phono preamps.

Typical Transrotor

In recent years, several Transrotor record players have stayed in my listening room for a review. Building and adjusting the Max was a piece of cake, but it would also be for those who do so less often. Typical for Transrotor, even a spacer for the correct position of the motor in relation to the turntable is included. If you do not want to have the engine in sight, use the short string and position the motor standing in the milled opening of the base.

The turntable easily lowers over the inverted bearing and can easily be removed again, for example to turn the string for 45 rpm. If you want to change the speed without removing the turntable, use the motor externally or add one of the optional external motor feeds with speed control. Because also possibilities for upgrading turntables is typical for Transrotor.

The player was connected to a NAD M12 preamp, during the review period it was exchanged with its internal phono preamplifier and an external Goldenote Phono 1. The NAD M22 power amplifier sent Blue Note (now called the brand Gold Note) Reale speakers via Kimber Kable 8TC loudspeaker cables. The components are connected to AudioQuest Earth and Water cabling and the power supply is provided via a separate power group consisting of Chord, HMS, PS Audio and Cassiopeia parts.

Listening part 1: little fun

The Transrotor Max is as stated in the cheapest complete version. After having played for some time with the Goldring Elektra included in that package, it became clear that there is unfortunately little high-quality listening pleasure in that combination. For the price that is asked for this element he plays fine, but it never gets exciting. The Max in combination with the Elektra sounds pretty nice, can handle dynamic parts of music and also shows basses in a controlled manner. The internship is not wide, however, and to be honest, the reproduction sounds dull and subdued. I have been able to experience a lot more musical pleasure with, for example, the AT-95E element in the Audio-Technica AT-LP 5 that I recently had for review.

Was that record player, who only needs to record a sixth part of this Transrotor, than so much better than the Max? It is natural to compare apples with pears and with a player with this structure, every technical comparison goes wrong. As an independent reviewer, I am concerned with the fact that you, as a reader, get a good idea of ​​the discussed product and that is why I see it as a duty to have the suffering subject of the review perform as well as possible. Like any consumer would do (or let do by a really good dealer). So I installed another element in the headshell, the better Goldring Eroica LX in this price range. This low-output MC element normally works in a Thorens TD 147 Jubilee in my second set.

Listening part 2: more pleasant

With the correctly adjusted Eroica LX in the silvery headshell, a sound from the Transrotor Max unfolds that sounds a lot, even a whole piece, nicer. One of the albums I played with the Elektra element was A Natural Disaster from the Liverpool proggers Anathema. The thick cloth that seemed to hang in front of and to the side of the loudspeakers with the MM element disappeared like snow in the sun and the refinement is back. Now it also shows that the apparent focus of the Elektra on voices was caused by the loss of internship, spatiality and dynamics with the same element in the Max. The Eroica places voices more refined, but equally pronounced in the center of the sound image, while the Max follows and displays the complexity of tracks such as the intense Closer with accurate analysis.

Gare Du Nord surprised in 2015 with the strong album Stronger, which also appeared on vinyl. Plate side two houses the Suite La Dolce Vita, with the track If These Walls Could Only Speak . The intense subcutaneous tension on this track is mainly carried by Lavinia Meijer's harp, in addition to the intimate melancholic vocal style of Dorona Alberti. The Max / Eroica LX combination flawlessly reproduces this tension, with a slight emphasis on the lower middle area. The rest of the display is especially tight, analytical and can be called quite compelling for a mass run. The combination of some heat from the element with the analytical character of the Max is pleasant, although of course there are more compelling combinations to be invented. Fortunately, the arm offers the possibility to apply many elements and can even apply a second arm / element combination by purchasing a second arm base.

The music of Boz Scaggs' Silk Degrees, which was re-released by Music On Vinyl in 2011, is quite different. The Lowdown track presents the same 'drive' in the view I previously experienced, which I completely blame on - for Transrotor concepts - a lighter turntable with the milled-out grooves at the bottom, combined with the rigid bearing. Although I'm used to Boz's voice a bit more forward, the internship is broad and the combination gives the music a beautifully layered look. It does not sound very good, and although it is less lively, Max knows how to involve the listener in the music.

Also from the same label comes the very sophisticated sounding press of Time And A River by saxophonist David Sanborn. The song Ordinary People, which is based on soul and percussion, is shown dry but open by the Max.This also shows how immensely quiet the running gear itself is. Transrotor itself does not give a rumble value, but I still estimate it to be under -76 dB. This makes it easy to focus on all elements in the music, without having to concentrate on it as a listener. Like the hammond organ and the fine dying high tones in the percussion, which come out nicer. The layer reproduction is again checked and tight, the placement quite wide and beautiful deep into the listening room.

Conclusion

With the Max, Transrotor has created a nice addition to the lower regions of its own price list. The record player is - just like almost all players of the brand that I have ever encountered - extremely beautiful finish and exudes luxury.The option to process the motor in the player itself can bring an additional optical advantage, the player is easy to adjust and adjust and the TR-800-S arm is pleasant to use. A tip for those who want to do longer with the same string, turn the platform by hand and then switch on the motor, which prevents unnecessary stretching.

In addition, the Transrotor Max is also soundly capable of many beautiful things, as shown by the display in combination with the Eroica LX element. The player explains the music to the listener in an analytical way, but with a lot more drive than many other mass moves. The timing in the display is also excellent. The extremely quiet running gear is also an absolute plus of the Max. This view can be further optimized by the user by using an extra 9 inch or 12 inch tone arm base to mount another arm with an element and to upgrade the power supply with a Konstant Eins or Constant M-1 Reference power supply, which allows the speed adjustment immediately change from manual to electronic. Or you can purchase the more luxurious TMD bearing. This Transrotor is therefore an excellent basis to enjoy vinyl for many years.

Unfortunately, 2850 euro is still a large amount and I really have the heart that I think that the Goldboard Elektra element supplied with this 'entry version' does not fit at all. This moving magnet element is in its price range really not wrong, but in the Max is totally out of the question. In fact, the element brings down almost all qualities of this Transrotor. The choice for the Goldring Elektra as supplied element will be based purely on the wish to offer the Max under 2900 euro. Sadly, I had chosen to put the cheapest version 100 euros cheaper on the market and left the choice for an element with the customer. A good dealer will therefore only hear this player with a better fitting element, or the Max versions with a Transrotor Ucello or MC Merlo in the assortment.

That said, I have to admit that the Transrotor Max will be a great turntable for those who want to enjoy vinyl in an analytical way. By playing with different elements (or arm / element combinations), this way of rendering is adapted to the personal taste of the listener and the very solid construction of this player guarantees a very long life with sufficient upgrading possibilities. 

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Dimensions: 17.32" W x 33" L x 6.7" H

Transrotor MAX Turntable. Now at True Audiophile.

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Width: 24.00
Height: 16.00
Depth: 24.00
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